Central West Health & Rehabilitation
P: (08)9965 0697 F: (08)9964 7528

News


ICDC - Health Professional Report Template Feb 21st, 2017



Chronic Pain Explained - Chronic Pain Australia Jan 18th, 2017



Blood Lactate Testing Jun 13th, 2016
One of the goals of Central West Health and Rehabilitation is to provide opportunities for talented sportspeople and young athletes from the Midwest to achieve excellence in their chosen sport. One way we do this is by using various physiological testing techniques to provide enthusiastic athletes with the information they need to get the most from their training.

Blood lactate testing is a good example. Blood lactate curves have become important in the diagnosis of endurance performance, and are used for intensity prescriptions in endurance sports. 


This data is used to highlight an athlete’s blood lactate ‘deflection point’ and ‘rapid accumulation point’ during incremental exercise of any type. As well as a test of improvement, training can be built around these values to ensure an athlete is getting the most from their training time.


Blood Lactate Testing Jun 13th, 2016
One of the goals of Central West Health and Rehabilitation is to provide opportunities for talented sportspeople and young athletes from the Midwest to achieve excellence in their chosen sport. One way we do this is by using various physiological testing techniques to provide enthusiastic athletes with the information they need to get the most from their training.

Blood lactate testing is a good example. Blood lactate curves have become important in the diagnosis of endurance performance, and are used for intensity prescriptions in endurance sports. 


This data is used to highlight an athlete’s blood lactate ‘deflection point’ and ‘rapid accumulation point’ during incremental exercise of any type. As well as a test of improvement, training can be built around these values to ensure an athlete is getting the most from their training time.



Y - Balance Test May 17th, 2016



Call to boost allied health referrals to specialists May 11th, 2016




THE government should consider supporting direct referrals of chronic disease patients from allied health professionals to specialists to reduce the reliance on GPs, a parliamentary committee recommends.


The move would combat the circular process in which patients, in order to qualify for a Medicare rebate, must firstly consult a GP for a referral to an allied health professional, and then return for a subsequent initial referral to a specialist.


Under the proposal, rebates would be enabled only where a GP originally refers the patient to allied health. The GP would also have to indicate in the original referral that specialist assessment may be warranted.


The recommendation is one of 13 emerging from the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Health's inquiry into chronic disease prevention and management in primary health care.


In a 205-page report, released on Thursday, the committee also recommends increasing the number of allied health treatments that can attract a rebate each year. Allied health MBS items at present provide up to five treatment sessions per year, which may not be enough for those with ongoing conditions, the committee says.


The inquiry, which received nearly 200 submissions, also urges the government to examine reforms to the MBS to allow GPs to claim a rebate for a chronic disease management consultation and a general consultation benefit for the same person on the same day.


The committee, chaired by Liberal MP Steve Irons, showers praise on the Turnbull government's Healthier Medicare reforms, due to kick off with trials in mid-2017, saying they incorporate many of the committee's recommendations.


The committee also recommends:



  • That the government consider loosening privacy restrictions around medical practitioner access to patient records, noting the difficulties that occur when patients transition from hospital to primary care;

  • Boosting the amount and quality of data on chronic disease and service use in PHNs;

  • That the government explore ways to make better use of nurses in chronic disease care;

  • That the government examine the inclusion of an integrated health assessment check for cardiovascular disease, kidney disease and diabetes, where a patient does not already qualify for an existing assessment and the treating practitioner identifies a risk; and

  • That the government consider expanding the Practice Incentives Program to include breast, bowel and skin cancer screening.


You can read the report in full here.







Worksite Services Start for Golden Grove May 10th, 2016


Hydrotherapy can help shoulder pain Mar 5th, 2016

Hydrotherapy Exercises for Treating Anterior Shoulder Dislocation



Insight - SBS - Beating Diabetes Mar 2nd, 2016



Hydrotherapy is great for Sudden Low Back Pain Mar 2nd, 2016



The Lancet - Use of opioid painkillers increases fourfold in Australia in 10 years while most of the world lacks access to basic painrelief Feb 5th, 2016



Harnessing the power of water to train, relax, and recover Jan 7th, 2016
There are pools that contain water and then there are SwimEx Sports Therapy Pools, that capture its power. With adjustable water speeds, multiple design options and a wide, even current, SwimEx leads the aquatic industry world wide.  Our heated SwimEx therapy pool is the most versatile and powerful pool available for rehabilitation, therapy and conditioning.


Swimex Therapy pools are used by many American college and professional sports teams.  This versatile pool has adjustable depths of 48” and 60” (122cm and 152cm). It features eight distinct easy-to-identify coloured workout stations including angled plyo pads, open/closed chain kinetic exercise benches, floor inserts and an angled platform for the ultimate in aquatic running. The adjustable floor offers the option to gradually increase weight-bearing activities, creating the ideal aquatic therapy environment for progressive strength training and rehabilitation programs.

The SwimEx adjustable laminar flow adds another dimension to treatment and conditioning protocols and can be used for all levels: from the frail patient all the way up to the professional athlete.



The SwimEx Advantage:

Multiple water depths to vary weight-bearing status, enabling progression from acute rehab in non-weight-bearing environments to aggressive weight-bearing functional activities.

Deeper water to decrease swelling in an acute injury through hydrostatic pressure.

A variable speed laminar flow that targets different muscular contractions (isometric and eccentric) to achieve multiple goals.

A wide variety of workstations for stretching, seated exercises and/or closed-chain exercises.

Comfortable seating ideal for completely submerged upper extremity exercises.

The ability to treat your patient in a horizontal or vertical position to gain active, active assisted and passive shoulder and elbow range of motion exercises.



Safety matters: a safety and health training for young workers. Dec 14th, 2015
Surveys suggest that 80% of teens have worked by the time they finish high school. Although work provides many benefits for young people, it can also be dangerous.

As new workers, adolescents are likely to be inexperienced and unfamiliar with many of the tasks required of them. Yet despite teen workers’ high injury rates on the job, safety at work is usually one of the last things they worry about. Many of teens’ most positive traits—energy, enthusiasm, and a need for increased challenge and responsibility—can cause them to take on tasks they are not prepared to do safely. They may also be reluctant to ask questions or to speak up when they are feeling unsafe or threatened at work.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) have partnered to help make all young people aware of the critical life skills they need to stay safe and healthy on the job, now and throughout their lives. To do this they have put together the following leaflet.

 


 


NIOSH 8 Core Competencies are:



  1. Recognize that, while work has benefits, all workers can be injured, become sick, or even be killed on the job. Workers need to know how workplace risks can affect their lives and their families.

  2. Recognize that work-related injuries and illnesses are predictable and can be prevented.

  3. Identify hazards at work and predict how workers can be injured or made sick.

  4. Recognize how to prevent injury and illness. Describe the best ways to address workplace hazards and apply these concepts to specific workplace problems.

  5. Identify emergencies at work and decide on the best ways to address them.

  6. Recognize that employers are responsible for, and workers have the right to, safe and healthy work. Workers also have the responsibility for keeping themselves and co-workers safe.

  7. Find resources that help keep workers safe and healthy on the job.

  8. Demonstrate how workers can communicate with others—including people in authority roles—to ask questions or report problems or concerns when they feel unsafe or threatened.



Surfing Technique Evaluation - Lachie Jul 8th, 2015

Emerging Surf Skill Evaluation





Bottom Turn



Forehand



Backhand





Re-Entry 





Forehand



Backhand





Cutback 





Forehand



Backhand





Snap 





Forehand



Backhand





Floaters 





Forehand



Backhand





Finishes 





Forehand



Backhand





Jun 25th, 2015



After Hours Gym - Waiver Jun 24th, 2015
This is an important document and you, or your guardian, should read it carefully. By completing the Central West Health and Rehabilitation After Hours Membership Waiver, you acknowledge that you have read and understand these terms and conditions.

Joining a gym is a ‘recreational activity’ involving physical activity. Physical activity and sport in general contain inherently dangerous elements, and participation involves an assumption of risk. Accidents can and do happen which may result in personal injury, death or property damage. Prior to joining, you should ensure you are aware and comfortable with the risks involved, including those risks associated with any health condition you may have.

To the best of our knowledge, the facilities and physical activity programs offered by Central West Health and Rehabilitation have been designed and established to provide the optimum level of beneficial exercise and enjoyment without compromising the health and safety of those who utilize the facilities or participate in the activities. Because of the nature of the programs made available at Central West Health and Rehabilitation, and the equipment, which is an integral part of many of the activities, there is an inherent risk of injury which characterizes any exercise activity resulting in a practical limitation placed on Central West Health and Rehabilitation in its efforts to prevent injuries to participants, whether actively participating in exercises, utilizing the equipment or taking advantage of the various other facilities at the Centre.

Central West Health and Rehabilitation enlists your assistance in assuring that the facilities and the equipment are utilized in a proper manner so that the inherent risks which exist under the control of the Centre, as well as those outside the control of the Centre and partially within the control of each individual participant, are minimized by the participant’s thoughtful and cautious use of both the equipment and the facilities.

In consideration of the above factors, the undersigned participant acknowledges the existence of risks in connection with these activities assumes such risks and agrees to accept the responsibility for any injuries/illness sustained by him/her in the course of his/her use of the facilities and/or the equipment.

More specifically, the participant acknowledges and accepts risks in one or more of the following are as:


  1. The use of exercise equipment.

  2. Participation in related as well as unsupervised activities which are made available in the gym and other activities that may take place outside the Centre.

  3. Possible injuries or medical disorders arising out of the participant’s exercising at the facilities, such as heart attack, stroke, heat stress or other injuries which may arise such as sprains, broken bones, torn muscles, torn ligaments, etc.

  4. Accidents or injuries which occur within the facilities provided by Central West Health and Rehabilitation such as locker rooms, dressing rooms, and showers.

  5. It is recommended that participants consult with their doctors or other trained health professional before engaging in any activities which are a part of your planned exercise program.


As the gym user, it is important you acknowledge the existence of and the need for certain rules and procedures concerning the use of the equipment and facilities that are a part of the Central West Health and Rehabilitation as set out in Appendix 2. He/She agrees to abide by those rules and to make every individual effort to assure that the equipment and facilities are kept in safe and usable condition. Any breach of the rules in Appendix 2 may lead to your gym membership being cancelled, or prosecution for more serious breaches.

By signing this form, you acknowledge, agree, and understand that commencing a gym membership may involve risk. You agree and undertake any such risk voluntarily and at your own risk. You acknowledge that the assumption of risk and warning above constitutes a 'risk warning' in accordance with relevant legislation, including the Civil Liability Act 2002 (WA).

It is possible for a supplier of recreational services or recreational activities to ask you to agree that statutory guarantees under the Australian Consumer Law (which is Schedule 2 of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 (Commonwealth) do not apply to you (or a person for whom or on whose behalf you are acquiring the services or activities).

If you sign this form, you will be agreeing that your rights (or the rights of a person for whom or on whose behalf you are acquiring the services) to sue the supplier in relation to recreational services or recreational activities that you undertake because the services or recreational activities provided were not in accordance with the guarantees are excluded, restricted or modified as set out in Appendix 1.

Print Waiver to Sign


Next - Gym Safety



Centrals - Gym Safety Procedures Jun 23rd, 2015
Joining a gym is a ‘recreational activity’ involving physical activity. Physical activity and sport in general contain inherently dangerous elements, and participation involves an assumption of risk. Accidents can and do happen which may result in personal injury, death or property damage. Prior to joining, you should ensure you are aware and comfortable with the risks involved, including those risks associated with any health condition you may have.

To the best of our knowledge, the facilities and physical activity programs offered have been designed and established to provide the optimum level of beneficial exercise and enjoyment without compromising the health and safety of those who utilize the facilities or participate in the activities. Because of the nature of the programs made available, and the equipment, which is an integral part of many of the activities, there is an inherent risk of injury which characterizes any exercise activity resulting in a practical limitation placed on Centrals in its efforts to prevent injuries to participants, whether actively participating in exercises, utilizing the equipment or taking advantage of the various other facilities at the Centre.

Centrals enlists your assistance in assuring that the facilities and the equipment are utilized in a proper manner so that the inherent risks which exist under the control of the Centre, as well as those outside the control of the Centre and partially within the control of each individual participant, are minimized by the participant’s thoughtful and cautious use of both the equipment and the facilities.

In consideration of the above factors, the undersigned participant acknowledges the existence of risks in connection with these activities assumes such risks and agrees to accept the responsibility for any injuries/illness sustained by him/her in the course of his/her use of the facilities and/or the equipment.

More specifically, the participant acknowledges and accepts risks in one or more of the following are as:


  1. The use of exercise equipment.

  2. Participation in related as well as unsupervised activities which are made available in the gym and other activities that may take place outside the Centre.

  3. Possible injuries or medical disorders arising out of the participant’s exercising at the facilities, such as heart attack, stroke, heat stress or other injuries which may arise such as sprains, broken bones, torn muscles, torn ligaments, etc.

  4. Accidents or injuries which occur within the facilities provided by Centrals such as locker rooms, dressing rooms, and showers.

  5. It is recommended that participants consult with their doctors or other trained health professional before engaging in any activities which are a part of your planned exercise program.


As the gym user, it is important you acknowledge the existence of and the need for certain rules and procedures concerning the use of the equipment and facilities that are a part of the Centrals as set out in Appendix 2. He/She agrees to abide by those rules and to make every individual effort to assure that the equipment and facilities are kept in safe and usable condition. Any breach of the rules in Appendix 2 may lead to your gym membership being cancelled, or prosecution for more serious breaches.


Next - General Gym Safety


Back - Centrals Gym Safety Procedure



Centrals - Strength Training with Free weights Jun 23rd, 2015
Resistance training (also called strength training or weight training) is the use of resistance to muscular contraction to build the strength, anaerobic endurance and size of skeletal muscles. When you do resistance training repeatedly and consistently, your muscles become stronger.

Resistance training can be dangerous if your technique is not right. It is important to pay attention to safety and good form to reduce the risk of injury. If you are interested in starting resistance training, make sure you have an assessment and program written for your specific needs. Make sure you follow any medical advice and are shown the exercises by a physiotherapist, exercise rehabilitation professional or qualified gymnasium instructor.



Safety tips for resistance training



  1. Proper technique is essential. If you’re not sure whether you’re doing a particular exercise correctly, ask a qualified personal trainer, gym instructor or exercise physiologist for help.

  2. Start slowly. If you’re starting out, you may find that you’re able to lift only a few kilograms. That’s okay. Once your muscles, tendons and ligaments get used to weight training exercises, you may be surprised at how quickly you progress. Once you can easily do 12 repetitions with a particular weight, gradually increase the weight.

  3. Only use safe and well-maintained equipment. Faulty equipment will significantly increase your risk of injury.

  4. Don’t hold your breath. Breathe normally while lifting by exhaling during the exertion or harder phase and inhaling during the easier or relaxation phase.

  5. Control the weights at all times. Don’t throw them up and down or use momentum to ‘swing’ the weights through their range of motion.

  6. Maintain a strong form while lifting, as this will prevent injury through incorrect technique. Always lift weights within your own capabilities and slow down or stop if you feel the weight is out of control or too heavy.

  7. Use the full range of motion. It is important when lifting a weight that it travels through the full range of motion of the joint. This develops strength of the muscle at all points of the motion of the joint and decreases the chance of injury through over-stretching.

  8. Wear appropriate clothing and safety equipment such as gloves. Dress comfortably and practically (for example, wear clothes that do not restrict movement and allow you to sweat easily).

  9. Maintain correct posture and body positioning (form) to reduce the risk of injury at all times.

  10. Once you have finished a set, gently place the weights on the floor – don’t drop them. Otherwise, you could injure yourself or people nearby.

  11. Don’t train if you are over-tired or feeling ill.

  12. Don’t try to train through an injury. Stop your workout immediately and seek medical advice.

  13. Muscle needs time to repair and grow after a workout. A good rule of thumb is to rest the muscle group for at least 24 hours before working the same muscle group again.


Next - Cardio Equipment


Back - Centrals Gym Safety Procedure




 



Centrals - Cardio Equipment Jun 23rd, 2015
Aerobic (cardiovascular) fitness is one of the most important components of physical fitness. Cardiovascular fitness is measured as the amount of oxygen transported in the blood and pumped by the heart to the working muscles and as the efficiency of the muscles to use that oxygen. Increasing cardiovascular fitness means increasing the capability of the heart and the rest of the cardiovascular system in their most important task, to supply oxygen and energy to your body. Cardiovascular fitness is related to age, gender, exercise habits, heredity and cardiovascular clinical status.

Having good cardiovascular fitness has many health benefits. For example, it decreases your risk of cardiovascular diseases, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and other diseases.

Cardiovascular fitness is best improved by activities, which employ large muscle groups working dynamically. Such activities include walking, jogging, running, swimming, skating, cycling, stair climbing and cross-country skiing.


Next - Treadmills


Back - Centrals Gym Safety Procedure


 

 



Centrals - Cardio Equipment Treadmills Jun 23rd, 2015
A treadmill is a piece of exercising equipment that consists of a conveyor belt rotated either manually or by a motor. The user will normally walk, jog or run on this device.

The most significant risk associated with the use of treadmills is friction burns, especially to young children playing on or near a treadmill. The results of these injuries can range from minor burns to serious burns requiring skin grafts and potential permanent loss of the use of hands or fingers.



Next - Safety Quiz


Back - Centrals Gym Safety Procedure



Centrals - Gym Safety Course Jun 23rd, 2015
Joining a gym is a ‘recreational activity’ involving physical activity. Physical activity and sport in general contain inherently dangerous elements, and participation involves an assumption of risk. Accidents can and do happen which may result in personal injury, death or property damage. 

The following pages provide information of exercise safety including:


  1. General Safety and Exercise Technique

  2. Strength Training with Free Weights

  3. Cardio Equipment

  4. Treadmills

  5. Brief quiz to confirm you have watched all the videos





Next - Strength Training with Free Weights


Back - Centrals Gym Safety Procedure



After Hours Gym - Exercise Safety Jun 20th, 2015
Joining a gym is a ‘recreational activity’ involving physical activity. Physical activity and sport in general contain inherently dangerous elements, and participation involves an assumption of risk. Accidents can and do happen which may result in personal injury, death or property damage. Prior to joining, you should ensure you are aware and comfortable with the risks involved, including those risks associated with any health condition you may have.

To the best of our knowledge, the facilities and physical activity programs offered by Central West Health and Rehabilitation have been designed and established to provide the optimum level of beneficial exercise and enjoyment without compromising the health and safety of those who utilize the facilities or participate in the activities. Because of the nature of the programs made available at Central West Health and Rehabilitation, and the equipment, which is an integral part of many of the activities, there is an inherent risk of injury which characterizes any exercise activity resulting in a practical limitation placed on Central West Health and Rehabilitation in its efforts to prevent injuries to participants, whether actively participating in exercises, utilizing the equipment or taking advantage of the various other facilities at the Centre.

Central West Health and Rehabilitation enlists your assistance in assuring that the facilities and the equipment are utilized in a proper manner so that the inherent risks which exist under the control of the Centre, as well as those outside the control of the Centre and partially within the control of each individual participant, are minimized by the participant’s thoughtful and cautious use of both the equipment and the facilities.

Following are a number of short videos on exercise safety. To confirm you have watched each there is a brief quiz.




Next - Strength Training with Free Weights


 



After Hours Gym - Strength Training with Free Weights Jun 20th, 2015
Resistance training (also called strength training or weight training) is the use of resistance to muscular contraction to build the strength, anaerobic endurance and size of skeletal muscles. When you do resistance training repeatedly and consistently, your muscles become stronger.

Resistance training can be dangerous if your technique is not right. It is important to pay attention to safety and good form to reduce the risk of injury. If you are interested in starting resistance training, make sure you have an assessment and program written for your specific needs. Make sure you follow any medical advice and are shown the exercises by a physiotherapist, exercise rehabilitation professional or qualified gymnasium instructor.



Safety tips for resistance training



  1. Proper technique is essential. If you’re not sure whether you’re doing a particular exercise correctly, ask a qualified personal trainer, gym instructor or exercise physiologist for help.

  2. Start slowly. If you’re starting out, you may find that you’re able to lift only a few kilograms. That’s okay. Once your muscles, tendons and ligaments get used to weight training exercises, you may be surprised at how quickly you progress. Once you can easily do 12 repetitions with a particular weight, gradually increase the weight.

  3. Only use safe and well-maintained equipment. Faulty equipment will significantly increase your risk of injury.

  4. Don’t hold your breath. Breathe normally while lifting by exhaling during the exertion or harder phase and inhaling during the easier or relaxation phase.

  5. Control the weights at all times. Don’t throw them up and down or use momentum to ‘swing’ the weights through their range of motion.

  6. Maintain a strong form while lifting, as this will prevent injury through incorrect technique. Always lift weights within your own capabilities and slow down or stop if you feel the weight is out of control or too heavy.

  7. Use the full range of motion. It is important when lifting a weight that it travels through the full range of motion of the joint. This develops strength of the muscle at all points of the motion of the joint and decreases the chance of injury through over-stretching.

  8. Wear appropriate clothing and safety equipment such as gloves. Dress comfortably and practically (for example, wear clothes that do not restrict movement and allow you to sweat easily).

  9. Maintain correct posture and body positioning (form) to reduce the risk of injury at all times.

  10. Once you have finished a set, gently place the weights on the floor – don’t drop them. Otherwise, you could injure yourself or people nearby.

  11. Don’t train if you are over-tired or feeling ill.

  12. Don’t try to train through an injury. Stop your workout immediately and seek medical advice.

  13. Muscle needs time to repair and grow after a workout. A good rule of thumb is to rest the muscle group for at least 24 hours before working the same muscle group again.


Next - Cardio Equipment




 



After Hours Gym - Cardio Equipment Jun 20th, 2015
Aerobic (cardiovascular) fitness is one of the most important components of physical fitness. Cardiovascular fitness is measured as the amount of oxygen transported in the blood and pumped by the heart to the working muscles and as the efficiency of the muscles to use that oxygen. Increasing cardiovascular fitness means increasing the capability of the heart and the rest of the cardiovascular system in their most important task, to supply oxygen and energy to your body. Cardiovascular fitness is related to age, gender, exercise habits, heredity and cardiovascular clinical status.

Having good cardiovascular fitness has many health benefits. For example, it decreases your risk of cardiovascular diseases, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and other diseases.

Cardiovascular fitness is best improved by activities, which employ large muscle groups working dynamically. Such activities include walking, jogging, running, swimming, skating, cycling, stair climbing and cross-country skiing.


Next - Treadmills


 

 



After Hours Gym - Treadmills Jun 20th, 2015
A treadmill is a piece of exercising equipment that consists of a conveyor belt rotated either manually or by a motor. The user will normally walk, jog or run on this device.

The most significant risk associated with the use of treadmills is friction burns, especially to young children playing on or near a treadmill. The results of these injuries can range from minor burns to serious burns requiring skin grafts and potential permanent loss of the use of hands or fingers.



Next - Safety Quiz