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Daily step count, Insulin sensitivity and adiposity Jan 22nd, 2014

Dwyer et al (2010) Association of change in daily step count over five years with insulin sensitivity and adiposity: population based cohort study. BMJ 2010;341:c7249


Recent increases in type 2 diabetes and obesity in many countries, including the United States and Australia, have been partly attributed to declines in physical activity. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between change in physical activity (measured objectively by pedometer) over a five year period and each of body mass index, waist to hip ratio, and insulin sensitivity. The study concluded that an increase in physical activity over time, measured objectively by pedometer, is associated with better insulin sensitivity probably due to lower body fat.


Making life a little more physically demanding can reduce your risk of chronic disease




Management of Rotator Cuff Syndrome in the Workplace Jan 21st, 2014

The University of New South Wales Rural Clinical School, Port Macquarie has developed guidelines for the clinical management of rotator cuff syndrome in the workplace. Shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal presentation in primary care practice – both degenerative and acute. As such, it provides a challenge to all involved in prevention and treatment, from patients to clinicians to employers.


Document Cover


 Click to read



Flatulence - Good or Bad? Jan 21st, 2014

Funny little clip on a funny little topic.




Strategies for Preventing Back Problems Jan 20th, 2014

Arial M, Benoît D and Wild P (2014) Exploring implicit preventive strategies in prehospital emergency workers: A novel approach for preventing back problems. Applied Ergonomics. inpress: 1-7


Back problems are a major occupational health issue for most labour intensive Jobs. THe following study of Paramedics used a questionnaire survey of 334 paramedics and emergency medical technicians and an ergonomic work practice analysis involving shadowing ambulance crews in 12 medical emergency services (over 400 hours). A majority of ambulance professionals had experienced back pain in the twelve-month period before the survey. Work practice analysis revealed strategies and 'tricks of the trade' used by ambulance professionals to reduce the chances of back strain while working. Multiple regression analyses showed that self-reported use of such strategies was associated with fewer back symptoms. Preventive strategies should be integrated into specialised training programs the work settings.


Table 3 shows strategies used by the Paramedic staff, many of which can be utilised in other labour intensive roles


Preventative Strategies


 


 


 



Understanding Habits Jan 20th, 2014

To understand your own habits, you need to identify the components of your loops. Once you have diagnosed the habit loop of a particular behaviour, you can look for ways to supplant old vices with new routines. This little clip explains it nicely.



 



Sedentary Screen Time and Heart Function Jan 19th, 2014

GIBBS BB, REIS JP, SCHELBERT EB, CRAFT LL, SIDNEY S, LIMA J, and LEWIS CE (2014) Sedentary Screen Time and Left Ventricular Structure and Function: The CARDIA Study. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 46, No. 2, pp. 276–283


Sedentary screen time (watching TV or using a computer) predicts heart disease outcomes independently from moderate and vigorous physical activity. Screen time and left ventricule structure and function was measured in 2854 participants, age 43–55 yr. Sedentary screen time is associated with greater LVM in white adults, and this relationship was largely explained by higher overall adiposity. It is suggested that sedentary screen time potentially contributes to adverse cardiac remodeling through its association with comorbidities (hypertension and diabetes) and, to a greater extent, overall adiposity. The most plausible interpretation was that sedentary screen time contributes to obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, which in turnmay lead to increased LVM, LVM indexed to height and volume, and relative wall thickness. 


Sitting Killing You Graphic



8 tips to reduce the risks of sedentary work Jan 19th, 2014

Sitting Hams Graphic


Use these tips to help your sedentary workers avoid long-term health issues caused by insufficient movement throughout their working day:



  • Encourage workers to alternate between computer work and a variety of other tasks where possible.

  • Take regular breaks from typing and other repetitive activities, e.g. a pause break every half hour to stand up and stretch.

  • Commit to making life a little more difficult! Take advantage of situations throughout the day when standing and moving is possible, e.g. take the stairs rather than the lift, stand up when you are commuting on public transport. 

  • Incorporate methods to reduce sedentary work practices into your company policies and procedures, e.g. your working from home policy should promote regular standing breaks throughout the day.

  • If possible, change the working environment and task design to promote workers to stand and move around more often.

  • Train your managers and supervisors in the risks of sitting for prolonged periods of time and the importance of physical activity throughout the working day.

  • Encourage a working environment where there is open discussion about the best ways to promote less sitting and more movement.

  • Teach your workers to remind each other to stand and move throughout the day.


Exercising outside the workplace as a risk control for sedentary work?


While we all know that to maintain a healthy lifestyle, at least 3 sessions of exercise each week is recommended — long periods of sedentary work during the day can still have adverse effects on your health even if you exercise 5 days a week outside of work! So encourage your workers to exercise and participate in activities that involve movement on their days off (this could be done through a health promotion program), but do not assume that this means you don't need to implement control measures for your sedentary workers.


 



Sitting time and Death in Australia Jan 17th, 2014

van der Ploeg HP, Chey T, Korda RJ, Banks E, and Bauman A (2012) Sitting Time and All-Cause Mortality Risk in 222 497 Australian Adults. Archives and  Internal Mrdicine 172(6):494-500


Prolonged sitting is considered detrimental to health. This study aimed to determine the independent relationship of sitting time with all-cause mortality. Sitting less than 8 h/d and meeting the physical activity recommendation (2.5 hours per week) protected against death. The adverse effects of prolonged sitting are thought to be mainly owing to reduced metabolic and vascular health. Prolonged sitting has been shown to disrupt metabolic function, resulting in increased plasma triglyceride levels, decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and decreased insulin sensitivity, which appear to be at least partially mediated by changes in lipoprotein lipase activity. It has also been suggested that sedentary behaviour affects carbohydrate metabolism through changes in muscle glucose transporter protein content. 


GraphSittingMortality



Shoulder and Lower Back loads during cart Pushing Jan 17th, 2014

Manual material handling (MMH) tasks typically consist of activities such as lifting/lowering, pushing/pulling, and holding/carrying loads. The primary jobs of the workers at these distribution centers involve order picking and delivery, which typically are performed using manual handling aids such as carts, trolleys, and hand-pallet trucks on level and ramped surfaces. The use of such assist devices eliminates manual carrying and in some cases lifting and lowering, changing the nature of MMH tasks predominantly to pushing and pulling. It has been estimated that nearly half of MMHtasks common at workplaces consist of pushing and pulling exertions performed on level surfaces and variable inclined ramps.


Nimbarte AD, Sun Y, Jaridi M and Hsiao H (2013) Biomechanical loading of the shoulder complex and lumbosacral joints during dynamic cart pushing task. Applied Ergonomics 44:841-849


The primary objective of this study was to quantify the effect of dynamic cart pushing exertions on the biomechanical loading of shoulder and low back. Ten participants performed cart pushing tasks on flat (0), 5, and 10 ramped walkways at 20 kg, 30 kg, and 40 kg weight conditions. At the lumbosacral joint, negligible loading in the mediolateral direction was observed compared to the anterioposterior and compression directions. Among the shoulder complex joints, the peak reaction forces at the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints were comparable and much higher than the sternoclavicular joint. Increased shear loading of the lumbosacral joint, distraction loading of glenohumeral joint and inferosuperior loading of the acromioclavicular joint may contribute to the risk of work-related low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorder with prolonged and repetitive use of carts.


 


 


 



Returning to work after an injury Jan 16th, 2014

Understanding the role of your prefered GP, and the difficulties they face in dealing with return to work following injury can help improve workers compensation outcomes.  


Fenner P (2013) Returning to work after an injury. Australian Family Physician 42(4):182-185


Workplace injuries are common, cause significant morbidity for workers and have considerable economic impact. General practitioners can play an important role in facilitating early return to work, improving outcomes for all parties. This article provides guiding principles for the initial assessment and early treatment phase of injury with a primary focus on the rehabilitation and return to work process. A case management approach to assist injured workers return to work that involves collaboration between the injured worker, medical and rehabilitation providers, the employer and work insurers, achieves better outcomes. Efficient rehabilitation involves good initial assessment, effective early treatment, early mobilisation and good communication between all parties. General practitioners have an important role to play in facilitating this process.



Weight training cuts type 2 diabetes risk in women Jan 16th, 2014

WOMEN who regularly lift weights or do other resistance exercise may reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a study has found. Researchers from Harvard Medical School followed up 99,316 women aged 36–81 years who were participants in the Nurses’ Health Study and found that those who reported weekly sessions of just 30 minutes of total muscle-strengthening activity had an 18% lower relative risk of type 2 diabetes, compared to their non-weight lifting counterparts.


Grøntved et al, (2014) Muscle-Strengthening and Conditioning Activities and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study in Two Cohorts of US Women. PLOS Medicine 11(1):e1001587


 Girl Lifting Weights


 




 


 


 




Next Dietitian Talk Friday 31st January 2014 at 11.30am. Jan 15th, 2014

Temika Lee's next Dietitian Talk is on Friday 31st January 2014, 11.30am at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes Management and Chronic Disease Prevention programs.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading



Wrist posture affects hand and forearm stress Jan 15th, 2014

Qin J, Chen H and Dennerlein JT (2013)Wrist posture affects hand and forearm muscle stress during tapping. Applied Ergonomics 44:969-976


Non-neutral wrist posture is a risk factor of the musculoskeletal disorders among computer users. This study aimed to assess internal loads on hand and forearm musculature while tapping in different wrist postures. The sustained high motor unit recruitment of extensors suggests a greater risk than other muscles especially in flexed wrist posture. This study demonstrated from the perspective of internal tissue loading the importance of maintaining neutral wrist posture during keying activities.


 



8 steps to an effective health promotion program Jan 14th, 2014

Step 1: Gain management approval – it is important to have the backing of the company leaders and stakeholders to ensure there will be a company commitment to the program. Put a proposal forward to develop a health promotion program to get the ‘go-ahead’.   



Step 2: Determine the expectations and goals of the health promotion program – this step involves identifying the needs of the business and its workers in developing the program. How will the health promotion program benefit the business? What issues will it address? Consult workers and get them involved from the beginning to ensure the program you develop attends to their concerns and interests.


Step 3: Decide who will coordinate the program – there needs to be a person or a team at the helm of the program to ensure it is planned and carried out effectively to achieve its goals.


Step 4: Plan how the program will address the set goals and objectives – this step involves determining the methods you will use in your health promotion program to address the identified concerns and needs of your workplace and workers.


Step 5: Identify the resources and skills needed – what do you need to make the plan a reality? Determine the level of resources (cost, people, expertise, etc) needed to implement the health promotion program and seek out these resources. 


Step 6: Implementation – put all the plans into place. 


Step 7: Promote your program – you need to make sure that your workers know what’s going on. Encourage them to be involved – promote the program and make it inviting, point out the benefits and get your workers excited about it.


Step 8: Monitor and review the program – once it’s all in place, don’t forget to go back and review the program. Workplaces change, the people inside them change, and you need to ensure the health promotion program remains relevant. Make any relevant adjustments.


Healthier Workplace WA is currently offering grants to reduce out of pocket costs of Worksite Health Promotion.



The financial burden of physical inactivity Jan 14th, 2014

More and more people with sedentary employment appear to be having difficulty reaching adequate physical activity levels. New technology means less physical effort is required for daily living and life is becoming increasingly busy as we strive for cars, televisions, computers, and convenience. The apparent technological revolution is making us all a little 'soft around the edges', compared to our physically hard working ancestors.


Some suggest we expend up to 800Kcal less per day than our parents and grand parents did in the 1970's. This is the equivalent of 8-10km of walking per day.


More alarming was the data collected by the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. This was a large, continuing survey of the health habits of almost 12,000 Australian adults. Along with questions about general health, disease status, exercise regimens, smoking, diet and so on, the survey asked respondents how many hours per day in the previous week they had spent sitting in front of the television. Television viewing time is a useful, if somewhat imprecise, marker of how much someone is engaging in 'sedentary' behaviour.


This group concluded that an adult who spends an average of six hours a day watching TV over the course of a lifetime can expect to live 5 years less.


The financial burden of physical inactivity



 



Cost-effectiveness of Ergonomics and Manual Handling Jan 14th, 2014

There has been a perennial call for ergonomics to demonstrate that it is good value for money. Quite apart from the legal, ethical and moral aspects of ergonomics, Stanton and Barber, 2004  argue not whether an organisation can afford ergonomics, but rather whether the organisation can afford not to consider ergonomics. 



Health promotion programs - 10 benefits for business Jan 13th, 2014

Health promotion (or wellbeing) programs can be a very effective way for you to cultivate a healthy mindset and lifestyle in your workers, both within and outside the workplace.


The reason this is important is that the choices your workers make outside the workplace can affect their health and safety inside the workplace, the place where you have an obligation for that person’s wellbeing.


Examples of topics that your health promotion program may cover include:



  • physical activity/inactivity;

  • healthy eating/diet;

  • tobacco smoking;

  • alcohol and other drug misuse;

  • emotional wellbeing;

  • dental health;

  • mental wellbeing;

  • safe social environments/behaviours;

  • UV protection; and

  • sexual health and wellbeing.


The needs and nature of your business will affect what your health promotion program will cover, and how much time and resources your business puts into them.


What are the advantages of health promotion programs?


Health promotion programs involve educating your workers about ways they can go about adopting healthier lifestyles for themselves. There are many ways that your business can benefit from having an effective health promotion program in place, including:



  • increase in worker productivity

  • demonstration of company commitment to workers’ health and safety

  • decrease in workers’ compensation claims

  • reduction in absenteeism

  • reduced long-term health problems in workers

  • reduced turnover

  • reduction in health and safety risk of injury and illness

  • increase in worker motivation and job satisfaction

  • improved alertness and concentration on the job; and

  • attractive to candidates for employment.



Commit to making life a little harder Sep 15th, 2013
More and more people with sedentary employment appear to be having difficulty reaching adequate physical activity levels. New technology means less physical effort is required for daily living and life is becoming increasingly busy as we strive for cars, televisions, computers, and convenience. The apparent technological revolution is making us all a little 'soft around the edges', compared to our physically hard working ancestors.

 

Some suggest we expend up to 800Kcal less per day than our parents and grand parents did in the 1970's. This is the equivalent of 8-10km of walking per day.

Graphic

 

More alarming was the data collected by the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. This was a large, continuing survey of the health habits of almost 12,000 Australian adults. Along with questions about general health, disease status, exercise regimens, smoking, diet and so on, the survey asked respondents how many hours per day in the previous week they had spent sitting in front of the television. Television viewing time is a useful, if somewhat imprecise, marker of how much someone is engaging in 'sedentary' behaviour.

 

This group concluded that an adult who spends an average of six hours a day watching TV over the course of a lifetime can expect to live 5 years less.



Next Dietitian Talk Friday 16th August 2013 at 12 noon. Jul 30th, 2013

Temika Lee's next Dietitian Talk is on Friday 16th August 2013, 12 noon at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes Management and Chronic Disease Prevention programs.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading


 


 



LifeRISK Program - Online preventative health program. Jul 30th, 2013

A broad range of lifestyle risk factors have been identified that act independently and in combination. These Lifestyle factors have Economic and Financial consequences. These costs have been estimated for various populations.



Lifestyle risk factors increase your personal medical costs compared to those individuals with no lifestyle risk factors.


The following program will help you to identify your individual risk factors. The Initial Assessment is private and confidential, and covers areas such as diet, activity levels, alcohol consumption, smoking, family history and mental health.


This assessment leads to a LifeRISK Score.


Your LifeRisk Score is a 'dollar value' and can be thought of as an estimate of extra medical costs from now until the end of your life, due to your lifestyle choices.


You can access the LifeRISK program here or by clicking on it in the Quick Links.



Next Dietitian Talk Friday 7th June 2013 at 12 noon. May 22nd, 2013

Temika Lee's next Dietitian Talk is on Friday 7th June 2013, 12 noon at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes Management and Chronic Disease Prevention programs.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading


 



Next Dietitian Talk Friday 7th June 2013 at 12 noon. May 22nd, 2013

Temika Lee's next Dietitian Talk is on Friday 7th June 2013, 12 noon at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes Management and Chronic Disease Prevention programs.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading



Next Dietitian Talk Thursday 18th April 2013 at 12 noon. Mar 27th, 2013

Catherine Dumont's next Dietitian Talk is on Thursday 18th April 2013, 12 noon at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes Management and Chronic Disease Prevention programs.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading


There are also Supermarket Tours led by Catherine, please register your interest at the dietitian talk.



Next Dietitian Talk Thursday 28th February 2013 at 12 noon. Feb 21st, 2013

Catherine Dumont's next Dietitian Talk is on the 28th February 2013, 12 noon at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes Management and Chronic Disease Prevention programs.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading


There are also Supermarket Tours led by Catherine, please register your interest at the dietitian talk.



Next Dietitian Talk Thursday 24th January 2013 at 12 noon. Jan 21st, 2013

Catherine Dumont's next Dietitian Talk is on the 24th January 2013, 12 noon at Central West Health & Rehabilitation in Geraldton. This talk is free for gym members and people who are completing Central West Health & Rehab's Diabetes management program.


This talk covers:



  • Healthy Eating Habits

  • Glycemic Index

  • Fat Types and Cholesterol

  • Recipe Modification Label Reading


There are also future Supermarket Tours led by Catherine, please register your interest at the dietitian talk.